Bariatric surgery in hypothalamic obesity (2022)

Craniopharyngiomas (CP) are epithelial neoplasms generally found in the area of the pituitary and hypothalamus. Despite benign histology, these tumors and/or their treatment often result in significant, debilitating disorders of endocrine, neurological, behavioral, and metabolic systems. Severe obesity is observed in a high percentage of patients with CP resulting in significant comorbidities and negatively impacting quality of life. Obesity occurs as a result of hypothalamic damage and disruption of normal homeostatic mech-anisms regulating energy balance. Such pathological weight gain, termed hypothalamic obesity (HyOb), is often severe and refractory to therapy. Unfortunately, neither lifestyle intervention nor pharmacotherapy has proven effective in the treatment of HyOb. Given the limited choices and poor results of these treatments, several groups have examined bariatric surgery as a treatment alternative for patients with CP-HyOb.While a large body of evidence exists supporting the use of bariatric surgery in the treatment of exogenous obesity and its comorbidities, its role in the treatment of HyOb has yet to be defined. To date, the existing literature on bariatric surgery in CP-HyOb is largely limited to case reports and series with short term follow-up. Here we review the current reports on the use of bariatric surgery in the treatment of CP-HyOb. We also compare these results to those reported for other populations of HyOb, including Prader-Willi Syndrome, Bardet-Biedl syndrome, and hypothalamic melanocortin signaling defects. While initial reports of bariatric surgery in CP-HyOb are promising, their limited scope makes it difficult to draw any substantial conclusions as to the long term safety and efficacy of bariatric surgery in CP-HyOb.There continues to be a need for more robust, controlled, prospective studies with long term follow-up in order to better define the role of bariatric surgery in the treatment of HyOb.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberArticle 23
JournalFrontiers in Endocrinology
Volume3
Issue numberFEB
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012
Externally publishedYes
  • Bariatric surgery
  • Craniopharyngioma
  • Gastric bypass
  • Hypothalamic obesity
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • APA
  • Author
  • BIBTEX
  • Harvard
  • Standard
  • RIS
  • Vancouver

Bingham, N. C., Rose, S. R. (2012). Bariatric surgery in hypothalamic obesity. Frontiers in Endocrinology, 3(FEB), [Article 23]. https://doi.org/10.3389/fendo.2012.00023

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abstract = "Craniopharyngiomas (CP) are epithelial neoplasms generally found in the area of the pituitary and hypothalamus. Despite benign histology, these tumors and/or their treatment often result in significant, debilitating disorders of endocrine, neurological, behavioral, and metabolic systems. Severe obesity is observed in a high percentage of patients with CP resulting in significant comorbidities and negatively impacting quality of life. Obesity occurs as a result of hypothalamic damage and disruption of normal homeostatic mech-anisms regulating energy balance. Such pathological weight gain, termed hypothalamic obesity (HyOb), is often severe and refractory to therapy. Unfortunately, neither lifestyle intervention nor pharmacotherapy has proven effective in the treatment of HyOb. Given the limited choices and poor results of these treatments, several groups have examined bariatric surgery as a treatment alternative for patients with CP-HyOb.While a large body of evidence exists supporting the use of bariatric surgery in the treatment of exogenous obesity and its comorbidities, its role in the treatment of HyOb has yet to be defined. To date, the existing literature on bariatric surgery in CP-HyOb is largely limited to case reports and series with short term follow-up. Here we review the current reports on the use of bariatric surgery in the treatment of CP-HyOb. We also compare these results to those reported for other populations of HyOb, including Prader-Willi Syndrome, Bardet-Biedl syndrome, and hypothalamic melanocortin signaling defects. While initial reports of bariatric surgery in CP-HyOb are promising, their limited scope makes it difficult to draw any substantial conclusions as to the long term safety and efficacy of bariatric surgery in CP-HyOb.There continues to be a need for more robust, controlled, prospective studies with long term follow-up in order to better define the role of bariatric surgery in the treatment of HyOb.",

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(Video) Hypothalamic Obesity Awareness

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Bingham, NC, Rose, SR 2012, 'Bariatric surgery in hypothalamic obesity', Frontiers in Endocrinology, vol. 3, no. FEB, Article 23. https://doi.org/10.3389/fendo.2012.00023

Bariatric surgery in hypothalamic obesity. / Bingham, Nathan C.; Rose, Susan R.; Inge, Thomas H.

In: Frontiers in Endocrinology, Vol. 3, No. FEB, Article 23, 2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

(Video) How Bariatric Surgery Can Help with Weight Loss with Dr. Fuller and Dr. Fujioka | San Diego Health

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AU - Bingham, Nathan C.

AU - Rose, Susan R.

AU - Inge, Thomas H.

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N2 - Craniopharyngiomas (CP) are epithelial neoplasms generally found in the area of the pituitary and hypothalamus. Despite benign histology, these tumors and/or their treatment often result in significant, debilitating disorders of endocrine, neurological, behavioral, and metabolic systems. Severe obesity is observed in a high percentage of patients with CP resulting in significant comorbidities and negatively impacting quality of life. Obesity occurs as a result of hypothalamic damage and disruption of normal homeostatic mech-anisms regulating energy balance. Such pathological weight gain, termed hypothalamic obesity (HyOb), is often severe and refractory to therapy. Unfortunately, neither lifestyle intervention nor pharmacotherapy has proven effective in the treatment of HyOb. Given the limited choices and poor results of these treatments, several groups have examined bariatric surgery as a treatment alternative for patients with CP-HyOb.While a large body of evidence exists supporting the use of bariatric surgery in the treatment of exogenous obesity and its comorbidities, its role in the treatment of HyOb has yet to be defined. To date, the existing literature on bariatric surgery in CP-HyOb is largely limited to case reports and series with short term follow-up. Here we review the current reports on the use of bariatric surgery in the treatment of CP-HyOb. We also compare these results to those reported for other populations of HyOb, including Prader-Willi Syndrome, Bardet-Biedl syndrome, and hypothalamic melanocortin signaling defects. While initial reports of bariatric surgery in CP-HyOb are promising, their limited scope makes it difficult to draw any substantial conclusions as to the long term safety and efficacy of bariatric surgery in CP-HyOb.There continues to be a need for more robust, controlled, prospective studies with long term follow-up in order to better define the role of bariatric surgery in the treatment of HyOb.

AB - Craniopharyngiomas (CP) are epithelial neoplasms generally found in the area of the pituitary and hypothalamus. Despite benign histology, these tumors and/or their treatment often result in significant, debilitating disorders of endocrine, neurological, behavioral, and metabolic systems. Severe obesity is observed in a high percentage of patients with CP resulting in significant comorbidities and negatively impacting quality of life. Obesity occurs as a result of hypothalamic damage and disruption of normal homeostatic mech-anisms regulating energy balance. Such pathological weight gain, termed hypothalamic obesity (HyOb), is often severe and refractory to therapy. Unfortunately, neither lifestyle intervention nor pharmacotherapy has proven effective in the treatment of HyOb. Given the limited choices and poor results of these treatments, several groups have examined bariatric surgery as a treatment alternative for patients with CP-HyOb.While a large body of evidence exists supporting the use of bariatric surgery in the treatment of exogenous obesity and its comorbidities, its role in the treatment of HyOb has yet to be defined. To date, the existing literature on bariatric surgery in CP-HyOb is largely limited to case reports and series with short term follow-up. Here we review the current reports on the use of bariatric surgery in the treatment of CP-HyOb. We also compare these results to those reported for other populations of HyOb, including Prader-Willi Syndrome, Bardet-Biedl syndrome, and hypothalamic melanocortin signaling defects. While initial reports of bariatric surgery in CP-HyOb are promising, their limited scope makes it difficult to draw any substantial conclusions as to the long term safety and efficacy of bariatric surgery in CP-HyOb.There continues to be a need for more robust, controlled, prospective studies with long term follow-up in order to better define the role of bariatric surgery in the treatment of HyOb.

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(Video) Hypothalamic Obesity

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(Video) Overview of Hypothalamic Obesity

FAQs

How do you lose weight with hypothalamic obesity? ›

Hypothalamic Obesity Treatment

Some medications have been used with some measures of success with hypothalamic obesity. Gastric bypass surgery has also been found to help with weight loss and managing hunger in people with hypothalamic obesity. After surgery, the person loses weight. The body makes less insulin.

What is hypothalamic obesity? ›

Hypothalamic obesity is a type of obesity that is caused when the hypothalamus doesn't function normally. One of the most common reasons for a child to develop hypothalamic obesity is treatment for a brain tumor impacting the hypothalamus. Any injury to the hypothalamus can cause the condition.

What BMI is too high for bariatric surgery? ›

The Relationship Between BMIs and Bariatric Surgery

A BMI of 40 or higher is typically required for a patient to undergo bariatric surgery, although some procedures may be recommended for patients with a BMI as low as 30.

What is the BMI criteria for bariatric surgery? ›

Your patient may be a candidate for bariatric surgery if they meet the following criteria: BMI of 35 to 39.9, with two or more comorbidities, such as diabetes, hypertension, sleep apnea or heart disease. BMI of 40 or more, with or without comorbidities.

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