Help please! Vinyl Wrap or Polyurethane?? | Houzz AU (2023)

Explore Discussions

Design DilemmaBuilding a HomeKitchens

Pazz

7 years ago

last modified: 5 years ago

Just got an email from our builder saying that they are having issues with their vinyl wrap warranty and are therefore giving us the option to upgrade our kitchen cabinetry to 2pak at no extra cost (is it more expensive/better?) or to keep the vinyl wrap (any cons vinyl wrap?) We need to make a decision soon as works have already started on site and they need to order the cabinetry as soon as possible. Any feedback most welcome please!

Featured Answer

  • mldesign0401

    7 years ago

    last modified: 7 years ago

    Vinyl wrap or thermo formed doors are a coated door that undergoes a heat vacuum process to wrap an mdf door substrate. 2 PAC painted doors undergoe a heat set sprayed or bonded process with polyurethane varnish as the finish. Both are on an mdf door.

    Vinyl is far cheaper, about a 6on a 1-10 scale with 2pac being a 8-9. 2pac is considered top of the tree, but in my professional opinion I find vinyl doors more durable. It used to be the case that 2 PAC offered a greater finish range, being able to specify your sheen level, however most consumers went with the usual gloss, satin or matte anyway, which vinyl are available in.

    2 PAC gives the option of unlimited colour and is their single most advantage, however with numerous vinyl manufacturers and again most consumers relegating back to basic whites or neutrals, thatis rarely a problem unless you want a specific colour match.

    If you were to damage vinyl or two pack, vinyl would split and two pack would crack. Both require a new door.

    I will say, vinyl has the reputation, (misguided) that it is inferior because it's plastic, not so, and it can be seen with orange peeling, like cellulite, or uneven colour, even peeling. These are due to the cheap vinyl available in flat plat companies, and particularly imported nasty vinyls. Often vinyl imported from Asia do not meet the same standards we require here, and use a thinner vinyl with different bonding properties. I have been in factory and seen it made, and know first hand what composition vinyl should have.

    Australian vinyls from albedor, tesrol and laminex in that order are my preferences. They will not have the uneven colour caused by not using a double backed door, or peeling, caused by heat exposure, (heat guards are recommended regardless), and I have not encountered a peeled door by any of them.

    If you are offered 2pac as a free it is an upgrade, otherwise vinylis a ok by me!

    • Pazz

      Original Author

      7 years ago

      Just realised there is apparently a difference between polyurethane and 2pak??... if that's the case, then I meant 2pak

    • libbystano

      7 years ago

      I don't know about 2pak but I have had both vinyl wrap and polyurethane.

      I liked the VWrap more, it was tougher wearing than the poly.

      Good luck

      Libby

      Pazz thanked libbystano

    • Related Discussions

      Kitchen bench top finish: matt or polished?QComments (12)Okay, so as expected the matt suede surface is more expensive, not sure how much yet but when the builder says price on application, I can imagine it will be a fair bit more. Anyway, we'll see but something to take into consideration I guess... In the meantime, I was going through my idea books and found the photo below, which I kind of forgot about but is one of my absolute favourite kitchens... the point is just like the photo, we too will have a wall cabinet in matt black, the back of the island in matt black and oak floor boards in a natural/textured matt finish... so now I'm thinking maybe too many matt surfaces, interestingly they have gone with a polished stone top which I think is reflecting the light nicely... Our floors......See MoreNeed help for my kitchen and flooringQComments (13)Hi Sheila What a great space! We see something a little more architectural for your kitchen.. given that you are having that amazing timber ceiling.. You could honestly have either tiles or timber.. but for a good compromise between the two, dont discount vinyl plank! It is virtually indestructible, water proof, great underfoot, and looks just like the real thing! Maybe steer away from the mirror under the breakfast bar.. not totally practical, and would drive you mad cleaning it! But you could use mirror as a splashback.. Heres a pic of what we see when we visualize your space.. Our Bodo suggested board for you is the Lavish Board, similar ply woods, a little hint of black, and truly unique..After all, you dont want to create a generic kitchen that you see in every second house! https://www.bodoboards.com.au/collections/kitchen/products/lavish-kitchen Our concept boards provide a shopping list of everything you will need to bring the look together, including options of both timber and tiled flooring :) paint scheme, and differing budget options We would love to see your project in completion.. so be sure to send a pic! Good luck from the team at Bodo :)...See MoreI am renovating my kitchen and am finding the whole thing confusingQComments (6)You will often find that the advice you get from your kitchen supplier will be biased based on the products that give them the opportunity to make the most profit. I work as an independent kitchen designer (therefor making my money on the design irrespective of the materials) and constantly find that joineries try to sway my clients away from what I have specified based on what makes them more money. My advice would be that you will get better long term life out of polyurethane doors, but you will also pay thousands of dollars more for them, so you need to assess for yourself if it will be worth it. Some points to consider; vacuum formed (vinyl wrapped) doors will last very well provided that they are a reputable brand and the design is considered. For quality , durability, cost effectiveness and flexibility of styles I would suggest Polytec. They back their product with an extensive warranty. A good kitchen designer will ensure that appropriate allowances are made to prevent heat issues effecting the vinyl doors. These include supplying & fitting a heat guard around any built-in appliances and adjusting the position of the wall cabinets. You willI have problems with the overhead cabinets if they are positioned too close to the stove AND if you don't use the rangehood. If you purchase a good quality rangehood & ensure that you use it when cooking on the stove the vinyl doors will be fine. Also worth noting whilst the vinyl doesn't 'chip' as such it can still be damaged, with damage looking more like the marks / scuffing you get on leather surfaces (think of the toes of your shoes). It does take a fair amount of effort to cause this damage. With the polyurethane doors you will be looking at several thousand dollars more expensive than a vacuum formed door. One of the greatest benefits is flexibility in design and colour (including the ability to have much sharper profiles). Yes it is a painted surface and any painted surface can be damaged by chipping, however the painted surface is still quite durable. The majority of damage I see is usually not from regular kitchen use, but rather from kids who have snuck in with their metal tipper truck and crashed it into the cupboards. The beauty of it is you can touch it up with some matching paint and you will probably never notice. You will also be able to remove a door if the paint is badly damaged and take it into a paint store for re-spraying (but please be aware the colour will not 100% match due to the aging process of the other doors). Essentially there isn't really one right or wrong answer, it comes down to budget and the intended lifespan of the kitchen. As far as natural granite versus stone (Caearstone, Quantum Quartz etc) I would say this depends more on the look that you are after. If you actually like the look of natural granite & have a particular variety in mind you will not find a 'stone' product to give you that look, you are better to get the granite. The cost of granite varies astronomically depending on the variety, where it is mined from, how rare it is, etc. It will usually be more expensive than Caesar Stone. Natural granite can have fault lines in it, which is basically an area which has a propensity to crack. If it has a fault line it is likely to be discovered when the product is cut to size and the stone mason will have to get a replacement. Sometimes they like to scare you into thinking that your benchtop will just randomly crack one day but it is highly unlikely to have a fault line in the first place, and if it does, it won't crack unless additional undue stress is put on it (Like walking on the benchtop to change the lightbulbs!). 'Stone' which will be referring to manufactured quartz products like Caesar Stone, Quantum Quartz, Smart Stone, Silestone etc. is the most popular option for stone benchtops today. It is a man made product and is produced from quartz, resin and various aggregates and colouring agents. It is more cost effective than natural granite, but has a much more consistent look due to the fact that it is man made. Some people who like natural granite do not like the consistent pattern within the man made stone. Other than if you want that 'natural' look, it will be the better option for you as it is generally more cost effective and is also more stain resistant. Marble is a big no-no for kitchens. It is expensive and highly impractical with propensity to stain excessively, and requires regular expensive sealing. Thinner 20mm stone is the fashion starting to come through from Europe but it really hasn't caught on properly yet. I would go with what you prefer the look of, as this will change again before the lifespan of your benchtop is up. Good Luck!...See MoreDark colours for kitchen - help!QComments (8)Thank you to everyone who has commented - it is really lovely and so useful to have such thoughtful and encouraging comments! annab1997, the natural white is very yellow against the essastone sample we have, but does seem to work with the ticking. I'm trying a half strength version to see if that works - I also need to try it in the actual kitchen space but can't get in until the weekend (it is a building site). We don't really have any wall space in the kitchen/dining to paint as the wall opposite is full length windows. This provides loads of light to the island, but not much passing through to the back wall of the kitchen. Those small sections we do have - to the right of the bifolds on the picture - will either be in ticking (a great background to some of our artworks) or in the colour we paint the cupboards. I will definitely give the Resene colours a go as well as the Whisper White....See More
    • Pazz

      Original Author

      7 years ago

      last modified: 7 years ago

      Thanks for the feedback Libby. Can I ask how long you've had the vinyl wrap for and whether you've had any problems with it near hot spots i.e. oven, kettle, etc?

    • Pazz

      Original Author

      7 years ago

      last modified: 7 years ago

      Thank you @mldesign...

      I agree that both products are probably comparable nowadays (pros & cons) as I have heard that vinyl wrap has come a long way since first hitting the market. I also agree that you can achieve a similar look with either products, and the main reason we had initially selected vinyl wrap was of course because of cost, as this seems to be the major differential between the two.

      However, given that cost is now not an issue (as the builder is offering either options at no extra charge to those clients who are already at the "on-site" stage), we're wondering about this whole warranty issue as raised by the builder. Not surprisingly, their supplier is Laminex who offer a 7-year warranty on the vinyl wrap v a 10-year warranty on the 2pac. Although we don't know the finer details of it, based on the builder's indication, I believe that Laminex is failing to honour the warranty even within the 7 years based on a technicality (something along the lines of pull handles doors not being covered).

      Putting that aside, we realise that in any event if a panel gets damaged it will have to be replaced regardless. Our understanding is that when a vinyl wrap order is placed the entire cabinetry for the one kitchen is made from the same sheet of vinyl to achieve a uniform colour, so I query what would happen if only one or two damaged panels need to be replaced and whether they'll be able to achieve a close enough colour match or at all, particular given this fine print in the warranty...

      "...where, as at the date of notification of the
      defect to The Laminex Group, the type or colour of the alleged defective
      product no longer forms part of The Laminex Group’s standard stock range..."

      However, if any of the 2pac panels get damaged (which we understand is likely as they can chip more easily than the vinyl wrap) are you more likely to be able to achieve a colour match with the 2pac when replacing those panel(s)?

    • mldesign0401

      7 years ago

      I worked for the laminex group in the design centre, and was part of the team behind scenes and saw first hand the product, helped decide on the standard colour ranges and introduce new ones for the marketing manager

      I designed many of the brochure images you see across the brands laminex, Formica and essa stone. That is my kitchen.

      The warranty would be covered if the panel was not altered, the cabinet maker fitting handles, if in fact they are a top tab pull might have defaulted that warranty, and I'm surprised you would even be able to order a vinyl door and have it come off range in the timeframe of a single order, so I suspect your cabinet maker at fault over laminex??

      Also. Vinyl colour variation is not due to sheet size application, it's not created that way, rather it's due to the substrate and environmental factors. Batch testing is done frequently enough to ensure colour match over large quantity, enou undetected variation may occur. 2 PAC doors have more risk of colour variation, a they are formula mixed, quite different to vinyl which creates colour without pigment inclusions. I am curious what colour you chose that is no longer available?

      It seems a little hardto beleive a joiner would offer a product of considerable cost in lieu of rectifying your issue, not that I doubt your experience, just that it seems there am be an underlying reason for them to do that, toyour benefit ofcourse so take it.

      Pazz thanked mldesign0401

    • Pazz

      Original Author

      7 years ago

      I think my comment may have come across the wrong way, but I meant no offense... I have absolutely no issues at all with Laminex, in fact all our cabinetry finishes throughout the entire house is from the Laminex Group, vinyl/2pac and others...

      No one's at fault... yet ;) ... the builder hasn't even ordered any of the cabinets yet, they were just alerting us to reports they received (presumably from past clients, cabinet makers, who knows, like I said don't know the finer details) as they should under our contract, and as a result offering us the option to stick to vinyl wrap or to 'upgrade' (using that term loosely) to the 2pac at no charge, if we want to...

      Hence my design dilemma to make the choice between:

      - keep the Vinyl Wrap in Polar White Gloss finish, or

      - change to 2Pac in Dulux Lexicon Quarter (same as walls) in a Semi-Gloss finish

      Obviously, we haven't had any issues with the warranty, but in anticipation of worse case scenario, just wondering what would happen if a panel gets damaged in say 5-6 years time (or more) and needs replacing, then what is our best option/decision making now.

      I'm also curious to know:

      - if there's any reason for the difference in the vinyl wrap 7yr v the 2pac 10yr warranties

      - what you mean by "top tab pull" and if that's different to the finger pull handles (from the Laminex range btw) that we selected for all wet areas (other than the kitchen)

      - why "albedor, tesrol and laminex in that order are my preferences"

      Thanks again :)

    • mldesign0401

      7 years ago

      I took no offense to your comments at all. I'm not swayed either, nor biased by the laminex group.

      I'd myself go with the lexicon 1/4 to get that perfect match to your interior, polar white is very Starck, like paper, and I beleive is still in the core range???

      As for the tab top handles, they are probably what your calling finger pull, if so they will be mounted on the top side of the door and you just use a finger to pull out the lip and they are almost invisible. THe next best thing to a shadow line or finger grip detail. If this is the case, that's why the warranty is void! The joiner will need to shave mm off and slightly rebate this handle to close properly. Any cutting not a vinyl panel voids it's warranty, as it's like cutting open vacuum sealed salami and returning it for refund!

      Anyway they can avoid this by excluding this handle from offer, or anticipating its selection in the process before ordering doors, so they can reduce the door height by 10mm to accomodate etc, etc.

      I'm not sure why the warranty is less than the vinyl door than the painted ones, I think your referring to colour tech painted doors? There is also crystal gloss wi a polyurethane finish.

      Lastly, albedor and tesrol are Australian made vinyl doors, albedor has an extensive profile range of doors, one of the largest, a strong reputation and their service reps are well informed so specifiers always have a great relationship with them. Tesrol I like because they have great provincial accents or accessories like their capping moulds and elements to make a traditional kitchen quite grand a scale, usually only an optin for cashed up kitchens. They are based in NSW, but even in Melbourne, they always met our needs, although slitly dearer.

      And laminex doors, take the lead off both of those companies, and made here also. They have a very strict quality control, and although vinyl is not their primary product, they do well for service.

      There are many more worth mentioning, but I myself always ask the joiner who they order through, and ask for their vinyl brochure to select from.

      If they are not made in oz, then ask for another product, or another joiner. No sense in saving cost on a product which relies heavily on warranty guarantee, replacement and service will be met easier and quicker locally than imported, and more important, our strict standards are regulated to monitor the use of arsenic and formaldehyde, and is not adhered to in many imported door ranges.

      Pazz thanked mldesign0401

    • Pazz

      Original Author

      7 years ago

      last modified: 7 years ago

      Thanks mldesign... it all makes sense now... yes, the polar white is still part the core range, and you're right, quite stark as well, I've always had my reservations about that colour choice... hubby likes all surfaces white & shiny, cabinets, tiles, the lot :/ so I let him have that one, but I prefer matt and/or textured surfaces (I went with the 'not so new' alaskan nuance finish everywhere else which I'm very happy with)... so in a way I'm glad this colour/finish change was brought up by the builder without us having to raise a variation... now I understand the whole handle issue, and you're right it is something the builder/cabinet maker should know/anticipate (maybe that's why the builder hinted that they've recently changed cabinet makers)... in any event, all our kitchen base cabinets have 'normal' handles on the door/drawer fronts so that won't be an issue... and yes, we couldn't afford the 'handle less' (aka finger grip) look so went with the 'finger pull (aka tab top) handles in the laundry, toilets & bathrooms cabinets, but they all have a 16mm shadowline between the doors and the benchtop so if I understood correctly, no need to shave off anything and therefore won't be an issue... anyway, thanks again for your time and most valuable input (and insider info ;) ... we have decided to go with the laminex colourtech (aka 2pac) in a semi gloss lexicon quarter :)

    • mldesign0401

      7 years ago

      I'm glad to have cleared up some of it. Alaskan is very soft and has a beautiful feint texture. You will really love this installed.

      Just to be clarify, your lexicon quarter doors will be 2pac, but won't be a laminex colourtech door, as colour tech is a range under the brand of laminex, and as a range they decide what colours areavailale, and 'offer' per selected colour range in the 2 PAC finish. Hence the name 'colourtech'.

      Your doors will be bought in by the cabinet maker as raw mdf with a white primed base, and will be sent off to the painters to be painted in your specific colour finish.

      Seems like you on top of things anyway, just wanted to point it out.

      Good luck with it, I'm sure it will be stunning.

      Pazz thanked mldesign0401

    • Pazz

      Original Author

      7 years ago

      Makes sense, and noted

    • libbystano

      7 years ago

      Pazz


      I’m not much help to you there.


      I lived with my first kitchen, the Vinyl for about 3 years. The cabinets that were above the oven and stove top I don’t remember them yellowing at all. This was a

      Nobby’s kitchen so definitely not the top of the range kitchens, I don’t know even if Nobby’s still exist.


      Three years is not long to see how well it stood up. There was certainly no damage to cabinet doors or draws.


      Note that I am now talking 20 years ago.


      We had the good fortune to build our second house from scratch and I wanted to go with the vinyl again but for some reason, I can’t remember why, it was not

      possible.


      My current polyurethane kitchen is almost 19 years old to the month and yes it has stood up very well to 3 growing boys.


      We are looking to replace it soon as well.


      In both kitchens I have had the same laminated bench top. A granite look alike. I have to say it has lasted incredibly well and people used to ask was it granite.


      After 20 years it has 1 small chip in the top of it and a tiny burn hole where the hot ash of some incense I was burning fell on to it.


      I will definitely be considering laminated cabinets as well when we get around to replacing things.


      One thing I do notice with the polyurethane is the inside of the cutlery and pots and pans drawers are quite chipped and I remember that’s something I liked about

      the vinyl, it gave a nice protective covering over the edges.


      I think 20 years ago the one problem with vinyl was you could not have a straight edge profile on the cabinetry. Edges had to be rounded. But that was 20 years ago

      and I’m quite certain with todays technology anything is possible.


      I’ve just remembered you can. Kaboodle who supply Bunnings hardware have a vacuum formed perfectly plain door.


      I don’t know how much research you have done but take a look at Allplastic’s P/L website. They have a product called metalline. Which is an aluminium veneer. They also

      have lots of interesting products. Especially the product Staron manufactured by Samsung. Great product for sinks, baths. Used a lot in kitchens as it is a very compact

      product that cleans very well. So hygienic they use it in hospitals because the germs can’t get into it.


      Another interesting product for bench tops, shelving etc is called Paper Rock. Made from recycled paper. Very new on the market. Search paper rock Leichhardt, Sydney

      and you should find it.


      Don’t forget to have fun with this process.


      Libby

      Pazz thanked libbystano

    • Pazz

      Original Author

      7 years ago

      Thanks Libby.

      We have no issues at all with our kitchen bench top as it will be an engineered stone which we're very happy with.

      We were only undecided about a vinyl wrap v polyurethane finish for the kitchen cabinetry doors/drawers.

      But your comment... "My current polyurethane kitchen is almost 19 years old to the month and yes it has stood up very well to 3 growing boys"... is most reassuring, and cements our decision to go for the poly finish.

      Thank you again :)

    • Joy

      5 years ago

      last modified: 5 years ago

      Our kitchen guy strongly recommends vinyl wrap over polyurethane. He says it is far more durable. My concern is what happens if the colour choice of the vinyl wrap is eventually discontinued and we need a single door replacing due to damage in the future. Which is the better product? Most of the large kitchen companies seem to use polyurethane whilst our kitchen man strongly prefers the vinyl wrap- he is happy to use polyurethane if we want it. We are very confused. Please help.

    Top Articles
    Latest Posts
    Article information

    Author: Jeremiah Abshire

    Last Updated: 01/15/2023

    Views: 5565

    Rating: 4.3 / 5 (54 voted)

    Reviews: 85% of readers found this page helpful

    Author information

    Name: Jeremiah Abshire

    Birthday: 1993-09-14

    Address: Apt. 425 92748 Jannie Centers, Port Nikitaville, VT 82110

    Phone: +8096210939894

    Job: Lead Healthcare Manager

    Hobby: Watching movies, Watching movies, Knapping, LARPing, Coffee roasting, Lacemaking, Gaming

    Introduction: My name is Jeremiah Abshire, I am a outstanding, kind, clever, hilarious, curious, hilarious, outstanding person who loves writing and wants to share my knowledge and understanding with you.